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Apparently not the only time this happened. #tbt

Apparently not the only time this happened. #tbt

underhuntressmoon:

Grandchildren petting zoo omfg

(Source: sandandglass)

pnssy:

I WANT TO CUDDLE YOU BUT I ALSO WANT TO FUCK YOU HARD I AM CONFLICTED

Fuck hard first, then cuddle.

You really CAN have it all, ladies.

newageamazon:

the-thorster:

lokitude:

….

The Fall Soldier

whoa there satan

THIS IS BEYOND NOT OKAY.

I’m really conflicted about being sad about The Fall Solider and being horribly distracted by The Summer Solider

newageamazon:

the-thorster:

lokitude:

….

The Fall Soldier

whoa there satan

THIS IS BEYOND NOT OKAY.

I’m really conflicted about being sad about The Fall Solider and being horribly distracted by The Summer Solider

(Source: daryl-the-lil-asskicker)

emmaeuphoria:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly


“Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” - Kevin Spak, Newser


"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly


Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. - Leanne Aguilera, E! Online


"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It


The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress


So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly


"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon


"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic


"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint


"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes


"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times


In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times


The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky


His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.


It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club


If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate


This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired


"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine


I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon


"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine


"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week


The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire


I love GoT, the TV show, but it bugs me that they’ve repeatedly put in a rape scene where the book had a consensual scene.  I had a hard time getting to like Khal Drogo in the TV series because of how his marriage to Dany starts. Then I read that same scene in the book, where GRRM goes out of his way to establish that Drogo knows the word no and Dany can say it any time, and was like “Oh, okay, Drogo is a good guy; he respects her. He’s not just like her brother.”
It’s just unbelievable that Jamie, having just lost his hand because he saved Brienne from rape, would rape Cercei. We were all just getting to like him. He seemed vulnerable and human and remorseful and stuff. With Joffrey dead we were at like 50% likable Lannisters. Ugh.
And it’s also alarming the director doesn’t seem to think it was a rape scene he directed. What. 

I haven’t read the books at all, but I recently learned how Khal Drogo and Dany’s relationship is in the books and that makes much more sense. It never really sat right with me how Dany ends up falling for him. It didn’t really make sense. It sounds like it makes a little more sense in the books.
Watching Sunday’s episode, I was profoundly disturbed by the scene where Jamie rapes Cersei. A large part of this is simply that it’s a scene where a man rapes his twin sister/lover in front of the corpse of their dead son. But it also didn’t seem to fit the characterization of Jamie, even before his somewhat redemptive arc. After Joffrey died and people speculated who was responsible, I maintained that it would not be Cersei because above all, Cersei loves her children. Even Joffrey. And above all, Jamie loves Cersei. Or at least that’s what we’ve been lead to believe.
And then I read that Alex Graves doesn’t think it was a rape scene and that it “starts out as rape” but “becomes consensual by the end of it.” I don’t think I have to tell tumblr what’s wrong with that viewpoint. But that is a legitimately horrifying opinion, and I worry about what people less versed in the issues of rape culture will think when they read things like that.

emmaeuphoria:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly

Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” Kevin Spak, Newser

"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly

Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. Leanne Aguilera, E! Online

"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It

The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress

So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly

"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon

"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic

"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint

"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes

"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times

In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times

The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky

His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.

It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club

If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate

This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired

"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine

I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon

"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine

"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week

The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

I love GoT, the TV show, but it bugs me that they’ve repeatedly put in a rape scene where the book had a consensual scene.  I had a hard time getting to like Khal Drogo in the TV series because of how his marriage to Dany starts. Then I read that same scene in the book, where GRRM goes out of his way to establish that Drogo knows the word no and Dany can say it any time, and was like “Oh, okay, Drogo is a good guy; he respects her. He’s not just like her brother.”

It’s just unbelievable that Jamie, having just lost his hand because he saved Brienne from rape, would rape Cercei. We were all just getting to like him. He seemed vulnerable and human and remorseful and stuff. With Joffrey dead we were at like 50% likable Lannisters. Ugh.

And it’s also alarming the director doesn’t seem to think it was a rape scene he directed. What. 

I haven’t read the books at all, but I recently learned how Khal Drogo and Dany’s relationship is in the books and that makes much more sense. It never really sat right with me how Dany ends up falling for him. It didn’t really make sense. It sounds like it makes a little more sense in the books.

Watching Sunday’s episode, I was profoundly disturbed by the scene where Jamie rapes Cersei. A large part of this is simply that it’s a scene where a man rapes his twin sister/lover in front of the corpse of their dead son. But it also didn’t seem to fit the characterization of Jamie, even before his somewhat redemptive arc. After Joffrey died and people speculated who was responsible, I maintained that it would not be Cersei because above all, Cersei loves her children. Even Joffrey. And above all, Jamie loves Cersei. Or at least that’s what we’ve been lead to believe.

And then I read that Alex Graves doesn’t think it was a rape scene and that it “starts out as rape” but “becomes consensual by the end of it.” I don’t think I have to tell tumblr what’s wrong with that viewpoint. But that is a legitimately horrifying opinion, and I worry about what people less versed in the issues of rape culture will think when they read things like that.

Jordan Shusterman: 25 Greatest Barry Bonds Facts

oldtimefamilybaseball:

This post is part of the 2014 Blogathon to support Doctors Without Borders. Please donate what you can, even a dollar, to help them continue their mission of providing independent, impartial aid across the globe. 

————

image

Hey internet friends. I’m Jordan Shusterman, one half of the ridiculous blog, Cespedes Family Barbecue. If you haven’t figured out that CFBBQ consists of two people yet, that’s fine; we appreciate those that choose to bathe in the mass confusion surrounding one Twitter account shared by two different people. Anyway, I’m the one who tweets 98% of the Barry Bonds stats and stories that a wonderful number of you have quickly come to appreciate, and an equally wonderful number of you have just as quickly come to despise. 

I, along with my co-founder Jake (who wrote about The Wire for this year’s blogathon), were born in the year 1995. We are college freshmen. Unfortunately, our memories of Barry Bonds doing unspeakable things on baseball fields across North America are limited to fleeting images of his milestone home runs and painful hours of watching the media tear him to shreds shortly after he was essentially forced out of Major League Baseball. Fortunate enough for me, we live in an era where an unprecedented number of baseball statistics are counted, sorted, ranked, and discussed across a multitude of internet mediums. 

The career of Barry Bonds is one that has obviously already been drooled over on a number of occasions. A little over a year ago, Jonathan Bernhardt of Sports On Earth wrote about why Barry Bonds is the greatest baseball player of all time. Last year, for this same blogathon, Grant Brisbee wrote a passionate, poetic piece about Barry Bonds. Back in 2012, Jeff Sullivan wrote an abbreviated piece about some of his favorite Barry Bonds statistical absurdities.

In my attempt to add to the hopefully ever-growing collection of Barry Bonds magic here on the internet, I present to you my top 25 favorite Barry Bonds facts.

(subject to change)

25. For his career, Barry Bonds was 0-3 with 3 K’s against Rick Ankiel

…and it was all in one game. June 20th, 2000. In his first plate appearance against the then 20 YEAR OLD Ankiel, Bonds worked Ankiel to a full count before striking out swinging. In his second plate appearance, Ankiel struck him out swinging on three pitches. In his third and final plate appearance against, again, RICK ANKIEL, Barry Bonds struck out looking on three pitches. They would never face each other again. Rick Ankiel is one of two pitchers to have faced Barry Bonds four times or less and strike him out three times. The other one is Bartolo Colon. Bonds also only faced Bartolo for one game; June 12th, 2003 against the White Sox. First AB: strikeout swinging. Second AB: strikeout swinging. Third AB: strikeout swinging. Fourth AB: home run to take the lead in the top of the ninth inning.

24. Craig Biggio drove in 1,175 runs in his 20 year career. Barry Bonds’ home runs alone drove in 1,174 runs

It’s almost like Barry Bonds hit a lot of home runs or something.

23. 2001-2004 fWAR (FanGraphs’ version of WAR):

  • Barry Bonds: 46.6 fWAR
  • New York Mets: 46.6 fWAR
  • Milwaukee Brewers: 45.3 fWAR
  • Kansas City Royals: 31.0 fWAR
  • Detroit Tigers: 30.9 fWAR
  • Montreal Expos: 30.7 fWAR

2001-2004 was a fun time for Mr. Bonds, and this list makes that very clear. The level to which he was dominating baseball will probably never be seen again. Barry Bonds drew 120 intentional walks in 2004 alone. Meanwhile, I was being forced to memorize the Declaration of Independence in 4th grade. Speaking of intentional walks…

22. Barry Bonds has the most intentional walks in baseball history by a hilariously wide margin.  

Here’s the leaderboard:

1. Barry Bonds - 688 IBB’s

2. Hank Aaron - 293 IBB”s

3. Albert Pujols - 275 IBB’s

54. Ryan Howard – 143 IBB’s

133. Jason Giambi – 95 IBB’s

243. Alfonso Soriano – 67 IBB’s

326. Lyle Overbay – 55 IBB’s

435. Jeff Francoeur – 46 IBB’s

554. Troy Tulowitzki – 37 IBB’s

626. Luke Scott – 33 IBB’s

744. Clint Barmes – 28 IBB’s

It’s unfortunate the intentional walks weren’t tracked until 1955 because I’m extremely curious how guys like Babe Ruth and Ted Williams would compare to Bonds’ obscene career total. But this is what we have, and what we have is the most feared hitter in the history of the planet. 

21. 26.3% of Barry Bonds’ 12,606 career plate appearances ended with a home run or a walk

I like this one because it’s completely ridiculous. From 2001-2004, that number was 39.5%.

20. In 62 career plate appearances against Randy Johnson, Barry Bonds hit .306/.452/.551

Over the course of Randy Johnson’s career, RIGHT-HANDED hitters hit .224/.300/.362 against him. Lefties? .199/.278/.294. Bonds didn’t care for much for platoon splits, even if he was facing one of the greatest southpaws in the history of baseball. In fact, he hit .289/.417/.569 against lefties over the course of his 22 year career. 

19. From 1993-2007, Barry Bonds had more intentional walks than the Twins, Rangers, White Sox, Orioles, A’s, Blue Jays, Royals, and Tigers

lol

18. 49.1% of Barry Bonds’ 2,935 career hits were extra base hits

Barry Bonds ranks second behind Hank Aaron for most career extra base hits. To showcase how truly ridiculous this % is, here’s how it compares against the rest of the top seven on the all-time extra base hits list:

Hank Aaron: 39.2%

Stan Musial: 37.9%

Babe Ruth: 47.2%

Willie Mays: 40.3%

Alex Rodriguez: 40.9%

Ken Griffey Jr.: 42.9%

17. From 2003-2007 (ages 38-42), Barry Bonds stole 21 bases and was caught one time

Read More

Allegedly 30-50% of the MLB in the PED era were on PEDs. None of them accomplished what Bonds did.

tattooedwhimsy:

most emotional moment in television history

Who said you could post this? Rude.

(Source: unalike)

thebaconsandwichofregret:

nipplethief:

seduce me with film references

As you wish

(Source: nipplethief)

So in under a 12 month span, two of my cousins (different sides of the family) who are both 27, both knocked up their girlfriends after dating for like a month. 

Do they just not understand birth control or something? I don’t get it.

Apr 9

Date a girl who reads but not someone who has strong opinions she must be educated but you must be smarter than she is, sleep with whomever you want but bring only the virgin home to mom, make sure she’s funny wild wacky but not too energetic not too loud, give her a dark side but only one that’s easily cured she’s got to love video games but you have to be better at them make sure she’s a writer make sure at least once you break a poet’s heart, it makes you immortal when she spills your history onto pages filled with her pain - be sure to call her insane to your friends, shake your head, wonder aloud what the fuck is wrong with her for loving someone, for loving you, drag her name through the mud just because she was stupid enough to believe everything you told her - make sure she has good fashion sense and tasteful makeup but isn’t obsessed with it just so you can show her off to your friends but at the same time be sure she’s still attractive in sweats measure her waist with your fingers to ensure she is skinny but only naturally so, don’t you know bones are for dogs but too many curves and she’s not good at all, feel free to make fun of her salads and yogurts and granola, disregard the idea that she’s doing this all for you and she wants to sit around and eat cake instead of impress you, make sure she has some kind of cause but never one that shouts too loud, a girl who likes art a girl who likes math a girl who likes anything just as long as it isn’t too much that’s just annoying, a girl who likes to cook and will take “get back in the kitchen” as a joke, who likes to clean but doesn’t mind your mess, who is calm but passionate but exercises good judgement but is willing to take a risk who wants kids but only when you suggest them who is practical but believes in magic who is gentle but fucks hard who is pious unless you are in private who bends her knees for god but also to suck your dick who responds to your every touch like she is made thoughtless by it but still has some kind of mysteriousness who is obedient but independent loving but hard to get caring but not clingy talented but willing to give up her passions for you - but no, don’t worry about who you are or how you act. She’ll change to please you. You don’t have to be a good husband, she will believe she has to be perfect no matter what happens. The only flaws she is allowed are tiny ones. Girls need to be capable, honest, needing. Who cares if a girl like this doesn’t exist. We’ll convince them all to read our requirements and make themselves fit.

- Society’s recipe for the impossible girl my brother should marry (part 2/2 of a series) /// r.i.d  (via communistmanipesto)